Vaccination Schedule

Here is a checklist of the vaccines that are routinely offered to everyone in the UK, and the age at which you should ideally have them.

2 months

5-in-1 (DTaP/IPV/Hib) vaccine – this single jab contains vaccines to protect against five separate diseases: diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough (pertussis), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (known as Hib – a bacterial infection that can cause severe pneumonia or Meningitis in young children)

Pneumococcal (PCV) vaccine

Rotavirus vaccine

Men B vaccine (from September 1 2015)

3 months

5-in-1 (DTaP/IPV/Hib) vaccine, second dose

Men C vaccine

Rotavirus vaccine, second dose

4 months

5-in-1 (DTaP/IPV/Hib) vaccine, third dose

Pneumococcal (PCV) vaccine, second dose

Men B vaccine second dose (from September 1 2015)

12-13 months

Hib/Men C booster, given as a single jab containing Meningitis C (second dose) and Hib (fourth dose)

Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine, given as a single jab

Pneumococcal (PCV) vaccine, third dose

Men B vaccine third dose (from September 1 2015)

2, 3 and 4 years plus school years one and two

Children's flu vaccine (annual)

From 3 years and 4 months (up to starting school)

Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine, second dose

4-in-1 (DTaP/IPV) pre-school booster, given as a single jab containing vaccines against diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough (pertussis) and polio

12-13 years (girls only)

HPV vaccine, which protects against cervical cancer – two injections given between six months and two years apart

13-18 years

3-in-1 (Td/IPV) teenage booster, given as a single jab and contains vaccines against diphtheria, tetanus and polio

Men ACWY vaccine

19-25 years (first-time students only)

Men ACWY vaccine

65 and over

Flu (every year) -see below

Pneumococcal (PPV) vaccine

70 years (and 78 and 79 year-olds as a catch-up)

Shingles vaccine

Get Vaccinated to avoid catching Flu

A free flu vaccination is provided for all eligible patients between September and March subject to availability of the vaccine from manufacturers.

FLU CLINIC DATES FOR 2019

*Born BEFORE 1/4/1955? The come to our flu clinics on EITHER the 5th October, 19th October OR the 26th October

8.00am - 10.00am for surnames A to M

10.00am to 12pm for surnames N to Z

No need to book!!

Born between 1/4/1955 & 31/8/2002 - IF you are ELIGIBLE** for a free flu vaccine on the NHS then please attend on the 19th October. These clinics ARE BY APPOINTMENT ONLY. If you DO NOT book in on one of these clinics but still turn up we will NOT be able to vaccinate you. The clinic will run from 8am to 12pm. We will update this website with further clinics as & when we have dates available.

Born AFTER 31/8/2002 - IF you are ELIGIBLE** for a free flu vaccine on the NHS then please attend on the 26th October. These clinics ARE BY APPOINTMENT ONLY. If you DO NOT book in on one of these clinics but still turn up we will NOT be able to vaccinate you. The clinic will run from 8am to 12pm. We will update this website with further clinics as & when we have dates available.

(*there are different vaccines this year dependant on age. It is important that you only turn up to the clinic that is relevant to your age above. If you come to a clinic not listed for your age group then you will not be given the vaccination, so it is important you note the above dates/dates of birth)

(**to check your eligibility please see the list of conditions that ensure patients under the age of 65 are eligible. If your condition does not fall into one of the categories then you will not be eligible and cannot attend on any of the above dates. If you are unsure then please ring the surgery and ask. Please note if you were born BEFORE 1/4/1955 you WILL be automatically eligible).

Eligible patients are those aged over 65, or who have one of the following conditions.

Flu jab for people with medical conditions

The injected flu vaccine is offered free of charge on the NHS to anyone with a serious long-term health condition. That includes these types of illnesses:

Children with long-term health conditions

Children aged two to 17 who are at extra risk from flu because they have a long-term health condition, such as diabetes, heart or lung disease, will have the annual flu nasal spray instead of the annual flu jab, which they were previously given.

Children at extra risk between the ages of six months and two years will continue to receive the annual flu jab.

Pregnant women and the flu jab

If you're pregnant, you're advised to have the injectable flu vaccine, regardless of the stage of pregnancy you've reached.

That's because there's strong evidence to suggest pregnant women have an increased risk of developing complications if they get flu.

If you're pregnant, you will benefit from the flu vaccine because:

  • it reduces your chance of getting serious complications of flu, such as pneumonia, particularly in the later stages of pregnancy
  • it reduces your risk of having a miscarriage, or your baby being born prematurely or with a low birth weight because of the flu
  • it will help protect your baby as they will continue to have some immunity to flu for the first few months of their life

It's safe to have the flu vaccine at any stage of pregnancy from conception onwards. The vaccine doesn't carry any risks for you or your baby. Talk to your GP or midwife if you are unsure about the vaccination.

Read more about the flu jab in pregnancy.

Flu jab if you're very overweight

The injected flu jab is recommended for anyone who is severely overweight with a body mass index (BMI) over 40.

Speak to your GP about eligibility for the flu jab.

Read more about BMI and how to check it.

Flu jab for carers

If you care for someone who is elderly or disabled, speak to your GP about having a flu jab along with the person you care for.

Read more about the flu jab for carers on the Carers UK website.

This NHS leaflet gives information about the flu vaccination aimed at carers of and people with a learning disability.

Flu jab for health and social care workers

Outbreaks of flu can occur in health and social care settings, and, because flu is so contagious, staff, patients and residents are all at risk of infection.

If you're a front-line health and social care worker, you are eligible for an NHS flu jab to protect yourself, your colleagues and other members of the community.

It is your employer's responsibility to arrange vaccination for you. So, if you are an NHS-employed front-line healthcare worker, the NHS will pay for your vaccination. If you are a social care worker, your employer – for example, your local authority – will pay for vaccination.

In the case of health and social care workers employed by private companies, those companies will arrange and pay for the vaccinations.

The NHS has this advice on flu vaccination of health and social care workers (PDF, 131kb).

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